Asia generates half world's attack traffic

Dylan Bushell-Embling
telecomasia.net
Asia is now responsible for just under half of the world's attack traffic, with Indonesia leading the pack as the prime originator, Akamai estimates.
 
The content delivery network and cloud platform provider has published its Q3 2011 State of the Internet Report, based on data gathered from the Akamai Internet Platform.
 
The report finds that Indonesia was the top attack traffic source during the quarter, accounting for 14% of observed traffic. China and Taiwan were in second and third place, respectively, generating 20% between them.
 
Attack traffic originating from South Korea more than tripled, with the country becoming the seventh largest generator. The US, Russia and Brazil were in fourth, fifth and sixth place.
 
Asia is also responsible for sending over half the world's spam, according to research from security firm Sophos published late last year.
 
Akamai's report also finds that the global average internet connection speed is now 2.7 Mbps, and the global average peak connection speed is 11.7 Mbps.
 
South Korea still leads the world, with an average connection speed of 16.7 Mpbs – up 10% during the quarter.
 
While Japan dominates the list of the 100 fastest broadband cities, it trails behind second-ranked Hong Kong by average connection speed. The average speed in Hong Kong is 10.5 Mbps, compared to Japan's 8.9 Mbps.
 
No other Asian nation made it onto the top 10 list, and apart from the Australian city of Canberra, no other APAC nation's cities made the 100 fastest leaderboard.
 
Akamai also estimates that global broadband adoption grew to 66% by the end of the quarter, with adoption of 5Mbps or faster connections increasing to 29%.

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