Google admits compromising principles in China

Staff Writer
07 Jun 2006
00:00

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(Associated Press via NewsEdge) Google co-founder Sergey Brin acknowledged the dominant Internet company has compromised its principles by accommodating Chinese censorship demands.

He said Google is wrestling to make the deal work before deciding whether to reverse course.

Meeting with reporters near Capitol Hill, Brin said Google had agreed to the censorship demands only after Chinese authorities blocked its service in that country. Google's rivals accommodated the same demands, which Brin described as 'a set of rules that we weren't comfortable with,' without international criticism, he said.

'We felt that perhaps we could compromise our principles but provide ultimately more information for the Chinese and be a more effective service and perhaps make more of a difference,' Brin said.

Brin also addressed Internet users' expectations of privacy in an era of increased government surveillance, saying Americans misunderstand the limited safeguards of their personal electronic information.

'I think it's interesting that the expectations of people with respect to what happens to their data seems to be different than what is actually happening,' he said.

Google has battled the US Justice Department in court seeking to limit the amount of information the government can get about users' Internet searches. It also says it has not participated in any programs with the National Security Agency to collect Internet communications without warrants.

c 2006 The Associated Press

c 2006 Dialog, a Thomson business. All rights reserved

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