Verizon's cloud win SaaS provider's approval

Kate Gerwig
SearchTelecom.com
Modevity LLC is a textbook example of an early cloud computing services adopter. Founded in 2004, this Software as a Service company offers its global enterprise customers secure digital rights management for their content. By 2009, Modevity's founders wondered whether it made sense to continue hosting and managing its own technology or put any savings going forward on the return on investment (ROI) side back into core product research and development.
 
Modevity decided to assess cloud computing services, and its short list had two tiers of providers to consider for its move to a virtual environment: The first consisted of large, global telecom companies that own their network facilities; the second included traditional cloud hosting companies whose primary expertise was in the data center.
 
During its detailed evaluation process, Modevity had two requirements at the top of its list that are important to its current and future business plans.
 
1. Network capabilities and operations, an obvious cloud computing services-related issue that would help the company launch a secondary service for its customers.
2. Customer service, which wasn't even mentioned by the majority of cloud computing services providers that Modevity talked to.
 
In addressing both, as well as security, as part of its Computing as a Service sales process, Verizon Business won Modevity's business.
 
Because Modevity's customers rely on its ARALOC system to secure their digital content, the Verizon Business network, with its firewalls, security and supporting technologies, reassured Modevity customers that their content wasn't at risk, according to Modevity co-founder Tom Canova.
 

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