THE WRAP: AT&T vs. AlcaLu, Apple bans a developer

Robert Clark
telecomasia.net
This week AT&T blamed its vendor for a 3G network fault, as Apple banned an apps developer for fraud.
 
AT&T said Alcatel-Lucent’s network was slowing down data speeds for iPhone 4, while Apple patched a software glitch of its own which caused iPhones to give inaccurate readings of signal strength.
 
Apple banned developer Thuat Nguyen from the App Store over “fraudulent” activity after users complained their accounts had been used to buy his applications. 
 
Foxtel dumped a plan to offer exclusive content to Telstra after competitors complained to the competition watchdog.
 
Google remained in limbo in China after its operating license expired. Authorities said it would “take some time” to decide on whether to renew.
 
Google, Microsoft and Yahoo vied for MySpace’s advertising business. Google paid $900 million for exclusive rights in 2006. YouTube Mobile said it was serving 100 million videos a day.
 
Intra-Asian club cable APCN2 contracted NEC to expand network capacity to as much as 10Tbps. West African bandwidth jumped tenfold with the opening of the Main One system, linking Nigeria and Ghana to Europe. 
 
Nokia sold its wireless modem business to Japanese firm Renesas for $200 million, as its new mobile solutions chief vowed to take the company back to no.1
 
Lenovo boss Liu Chuanzhi said Apple was missing the boat in China’s PC and smartphone markets.
 
France Telecom unveiled its five-year corporate strategy, promising to spend $1.1 billion on staff welfare.
 
Telstra trialed LTE at 1800 MHz with Huawei, while eMobile deployed an early version of its Ericsson-supplied HSPA network, with speeds of up to 42Mbps. 
 
In its latest 3G plan, Thailand’s NTC hiked the reserve auction price to $395 million.
 

Pages

Commentary

Convergence with AR/VR to drive IoT growth

Francesco Radicati/Ovum

Machine learning is another key technology to enable development of the sector

Francesco Radicati/Ovum

Machine learning is another key technology to enable development of the sector

Rob Gallagher/Ovum

Multiscreen is rapidly becoming the norm