1 in 4 Malaysians own an illicit streaming device: AVIA

telecomasia.net

The Asia Video Industry Association (AVIA) is continuing its campaign against the use of illicit streaming devices in the region, this time turning its attention to Malaysia.

AVIA has published the results of research indicating that 25% of Malaysian consumers use a TV box that can be used to stream pirated television and video content.

These illicit streaming devices (ISDs) often come pre-loaded with pirated applications that provide free or low-cost access to pirated content from around the world.

More than half of consumers who own an ISD say they purchased their device from a major Southeast Asia based e-commerce store, with 37% having acquired it through a popular social media platform.

The research suggests that among consumers purchasing an ISD, 33% specifically did so for free streaming of pirated content. Of these, 60% cancelled all or some of their subscriptions to legal pay TV services as a result.

AVIA has in recent months conducted similar research in Thailand, where the association estimates that 45% of consumers use an ISD, as well as the Philippines (28%), Taiwan (34%), Hong Kong (20%) and Singapore (15%).

“The illicit streaming device (ISD) ecosystem is impacting all businesses involved in the production and distribution of legitimate content,” AVIA CEO Louis Boswell commented.

“ISD piracy is also organised crime, pure and simple, with crime syndicates making substantial illicit revenues from the provision of illegally re-transmitted TV channels and the sale of such ISDs.”

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