ISPs' defense against Apple lies at home

Elan Migdal
Friendly Technologies
As people go online for a growing range of activities that make their lives easier, computers continue to change how we work, think and play. From PCs to smartphones, the growing sophistication and capabilities of our computerized devices allows us to connect from anywhere to everywhere, and with greater broadband capabilities.
 
Whether it’s investing in stocks, booking flights or making money transfers, we’re feeling less concerned about security issues. Our interactions for both business and pleasure are increasingly happening online.
 
Now, the connected home revolution has moved to how we handle our major possessions – namely, the household itself. The connected home allows people to manage a whole new range of daily tasks online and delivers a panorama of services. These include entertainment, where people share multimedia from everywhere, and use multimedia content management, audio and video on demand, network gaming, social networking, education services, commerce services and convenience services.
 
In terms of security, the connected home can have camera surveillance, intrusion alarms, fire alarms and protection, and door entry authorization. As for automation, it can include appliance control such as heating and sensors, controlling lights, air conditioning, curtains, alarms and sensors.
 
The connected home can manage energy issues by monitoring and reporting on energy consumption, including support by a smart grid. It also has health and family care features such as monitoring of children and the elderly, health data transmission, and enabling doctors and hospitals to provide care with telemedicine capabilities.
 
For internet service providers the connected home is a golden opportunity and a chance to expand customer loyalty and increase ARPU by offering value-added services -- allowing them to establish their position as a technological leader. But while ISPs view the connected home as a chance to increase revenues, reduce subscriber churn rates, expand services and maintain customer loyalty − Apple is trying to take this all away.
 
Unlike other providers of devices and hardware, Apple puts itself in direct competition with carriers and ISPs. Apple turns to the consumer by establishing direct relationships. It sells content to consumers while trying to block carriers from uploading their own content. Apple is also looking for ways to provide additional services that are mainly content-based such as music and TV.
 

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